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Best sellers

There are 10 products.

Showing 1-10 of 10 item(s)

Variety from Japan
Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds

Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds

Price €4.95
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5, 10, 50 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The "Shizuoka Crown Melon" has the beauty of artistic form, a fragrance with the scent of musk, plenty of juice, mellow taste, and smooth texture, which is the high-grade melon cultivated in Fukuroi city of Shizuoka prefecture, called “Shizuoka Crown Melon”. “Shizuoka Crown Melon” is cultivated with sophisticated techniques of growers and grown absolutely in greenhouses. In other words, the ultimate taste of “Shizuoka Crown Melon”, which was born by outstanding virtuosity of professionals, has been taken over from generation to generation.</p> <p>The melon has been presented to the Japanese royal family for a long time and recognized as an elegant and prestigious fruit in Japan. Many VIPs also love Crown Melon. When the queen of the United Kingdom came to Japan and ate Crown Melon, we got words of praise.</p> </body> </html>
V 2 SC (5S)
Shizuoka Crown Melon Seeds
MAHALEB CHERRY or ST LUCIE CHERRY Seeds (Prunus mahaleb)

Mahaleb Cherry, St Lucie...

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Mahaleb Cherry, St Lucie Cherry Seeds (Prunus mahaleb)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Prunus mahaleb, the mahaleb cherry or St Lucie cherry, is a species of cherry tree. The tree is cultivated for a spice obtained from the seeds inside the cherry stones. The seeds have a fragrant smell and have a taste comparable to bitter almonds with cherry notes.</p> <p>The tree is native in the Mediterranean region, Iran and parts of central Asia. It is adjudged to be native in northwestern Europe or at least it is naturalized there. It is a deciduous tree or large shrub, growing to 2–10 m (rarely up to 12 m) tall with a trunk up to 40 cm diameter.</p> <p><strong>Description and ecology</strong></p> <p>The tree's bark is grey-brown, with conspicuous lenticels on young stems, and shallowly fissured on old trunks. The leaves are 1.5-5 cm long, 1-4 cm. wide, alternate, clustered at the end of alternately arranged twigs, ovate to cordate, pointed, have serrate edges, longitudinal venation and are glabrous and green. The petiole is 5-20 mm, and may or may not have two glands. The flowers are fragrant, pure white, small, 8-20 mm diameter, with an 8-15 mm pedicel; they are arranged 3-10 together on a 3-4 cm long raceme. The flower pollination is mainly by bees. The fruit is a small thin-fleshed cherry-like drupe 8–10 mm in diameter, green at first, turning red then dark purple to black when mature, with a very bitter flavour; flowering is in mid spring with the fruit ripening in mid to late summer.</p> <p>Prunus mahaleb occurs in thickets and open woodland on dry slopes; in central Europe at altitudes up to 1,700 m, and in highlands at 1,200-2,000 m in southern Europe.[8] It has become naturalised in some temperate areas, including Europe north of its native range (north to Great Britain and Sweden), and locally in Australia and the United States.</p> <p>It demonstrates selective fruit abortion, producing a high proportion of excess flowers that result in low fruit set levels. This reduces the number of "poor quality" fruit and increases the viability of its seeds.</p> <p>A scientific study[13] discovered an ecological dependence between the plant and four species of frugivorous birds in southeastern Spain; blackbirds and blackcaps proved to be the most important seed dispersers. When Prunus mahaleb is fruiting, these birds consume the fruit almost exclusively, and disperse the seeds to the locations favourable for the tree's growth. The way in which some birds consume the fruits and the habitats those birds use may act as a selective force in determining which genetic variations of the cherry flourish.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation and uses</strong></p> <p>The plant is cultivated for a spice obtained from the seeds inside the cherry stones. It is fragrant and has the taste of bitter almonds. It is used in small quantities to sharpen sweet foods, such as the Turkish sweet-bread çörek (chorak), the Greek sweet-bread tsoureki or the Armenian sweet-bread chorak. The chemical constituents are still uncertain, but the spice is prepared from the seeds, either by grinding and powdering the seed kernels, or in oil extracted from the seeds.</p> <p>The wood is hard, and is used in cabinet-making and for pipes.</p> <p>The bark, wood, and seeds contain coumarin. They have anti-inflammatory, sedative and vasodilation effects.</p> <p>Away from its native range, the species is grown as an ornamental tree for its strongly fragrant flowers, throughout temperate regions of the world. A number of cultivars have been selected for their ornamental value, including 'Albomarginata', with variegated foliage, 'Bommii', a dwarf with strongly pendulous branches, 'Globosa', a compact dwarf clone, 'Pendula', with drooping branching, and 'Xanthocarpa' with yellow fruit.</p> <p><strong>Early history of mahaleb in human use</strong></p> <p>Prunus mahaleb is a likely candidate for the ḫalub-tree mentioned in early Sumerian writings, a durable fruit-bearing hardwood with seeds and leaves known for their medicinal properties and associated with the goddess Inana.[19] The Arabic محلب mahleb or mahlab meaning the mahaleb cherry is in medieval Arabic writings by among others Al-Razi (died 930), Ibn al-Baitar (died 1248) and Ibn al-Awwam.[20] Ibn Al-Awwam in his book on agriculture dated late 12th century described how to cultivate the mahaleb tree: he says the tree is a vigorous grower, easy to grow, but a thing to watch out for is that it is not resistant to prolonged drought. He also described how to prepare the mahaleb seeds by boiling them in sugared water.[21] The word, and probably the mahaleb itself, does not appear in classical Latin, nor early or mid medieval Latin, and is rare in late medieval Latin. One early record in Latin is year 1317 in an encyclopedia by Matthaeus Silvaticus who wrote that the "mahaleb" is the kernel seed of the fruit of both domesticated and wild cherry trees in Arabic countries.[22] Another early record in Latin is in a medical-botany book by Ioannis Mesuae in 1479 spelled almahaleb (where "al-" is the Arabic definite article).[23] In 1593 the Latin botanist Carolus Clusius spelled it mahaleb.[23] Today its cultivation and use is largely restricted to the region that in the 19th and earlier centuries formed the Ottoman Empire. Syria is the main exporting country.</p> <p> </p>
V 216
MAHALEB CHERRY or ST LUCIE CHERRY Seeds (Prunus mahaleb)

This plant is resistant to winter and frost.

This plant has giant fruits
Giant Kumquats or cumquats Seeds (Fortunella margarita) exotic tropical fruit

Giant Kumquats or cumquats...

Price €3.25
,
5/ 5
<h2><span style="text-decoration:underline;color:#000000;"><em><strong>Giant Kumquats or cumquats Seeds - exotic tropical fruit</strong></em></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 3 seeds.</strong></span></h3> <p><strong><span style="font-size:10pt;">This is a gigantic kumquat, which is more than three times bigger than ordinary kumquat.</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-size:10pt;">Kumquats or cumquats are a group of small fruit-bearing trees in the flowering plant family Rutaceae, either forming the genus Fortunella, or placed within Citrus sensu lato. The edible fruit closely resembles that of the orange (Citrus sinensis), but it is much smaller and ovular, being approximately the size and shape of an olive. The English name "kumquat" derives from the Cantonese pronunciation gam1 gwat1 (given in Jyutping romanization).</span></p> <p><span style="font-size:10pt;">They are slow-growing evergreen shrubs or short trees, from 2.5 to 4.5 meters (8 to 15 ft) tall, with dense branches, sometimes bearing small thorns. The leaves are dark glossy green, and the flowers white, similar to other citrus flowers, borne singly or clustered in the leaf-axils. Depending on size, the kumquat tree can produce hundreds or even thousands of fruits each year.[1] The tree can be hydrophytic, with the fruit often found floating on water near shore during the ripe season.[citation needed]</span></p> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The plant is native to south Asia and the Asia-Pacific region. The earliest historical reference to kumquats appears in literature of China in the 12th century. They have long been cultivated in Japan, Taiwan, the Philippines, and southeast Asia. They were introduced to Europe in 1846 by Robert Fortune, collector for the London Horticultural Society, and shortly thereafter into North America.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Classification</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Carl Peter Thunberg originally classified the kumquats as Citrus japonica in his 1784 book Flora Japonica. In 1915, Walter T. Swingle reclassified them in a segregate genus, Fortunella, named in honor of Robert Fortune. Seven species of Fortunella have generally been recognized—F. japonica, F. margarita, F. crassifolia, F. hindsii, F. obovata and F. polyandra, as well as the recently described F. bawangica . The Flora of China returns the kumquat to Citrus and combines the species into the single species as Citrus japonica.[2]</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Varieties :</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Round kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The round kumquat (also Marumi kumquat or Morgani kumquat) is an evergreen tree, producing edible golden-yellow colored fruit. The fruit is small and usually round but can be oval shaped. The peel has a sweet flavor but the fruit has a sour center. The fruit can be eaten cooked but is mainly used to make marmalade and jelly. It is grown as an ornamental plant and can be used in bonsai. This plant symbolizes good luck in China and other Asian countries, where it is sometimes given as a gift during the Lunar New Year. It's more commonly cultivated than most other kumquats as it is cold tolerant. It can be kept as a houseplant.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella japonica (Citrus japonica) is retained by this group.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Oval kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Fortunella margarita, also known as the oval kumquat or the Nagami kumquat, is a close relative to Citrus species. It is a small evergreen tree, that can reach more than 12 ft (4 m) high and 9 ft (3 m) large. It is native to southeastern Asia, and more precisely to China. The oval kumquat has very fragrant citrus-like white flowers, and small edible oval orange fruits. The oval kumquat is an ornamental little tree, with showy foliage, flowers and fruits. It is also fairly frost-hardy, and will withstand negative temperatures such as 14 °F (-10 °C), and even a little lower for very brief periods. It can be grown in USDA hardiness zones 9 and warmer, but can also be tried in sheltered places, in USDA hardiness zone 8. Unlike most citrus species, the oval kumquat has a shorter growth period, and goes into dormancy fairly earlier in autumn. This partly explains its better frost hardiness.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Characteristics</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The evergreen leaves of oval kumquats are deep-green and relatively small. They can reach up to 3 in (7 cm) long and 1.5 in (3.5 cm) wide. The white flowers of the oval kumquat are similar to the citrus flowers. They are strongly perfumed, and they appear relatively late in the growing season, generally late spring.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The oval kumquat is a fruit that looks like any citrus fruit, with an orange rind. The fruits are oblong, up to 2 in (5 cm) long. Unlike the common citrus, which have a rind which is inedible raw, oval kumquats have an edible sweet rind. The flesh, however, is not as sweet as the rind, and the juice is quite acidic and sour, with a lemon-like flavor. This fruit is generally eaten fresh, with its rind. It can also be processed into preserves, jams, and other products.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Cultivation</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The oval kumquat needs a well-drained and fertile ground. It dislikes alkaline soils. The oval kumquat is susceptible to common citrus pests and diseases.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Jiangsu kumquat</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The Jiangsu kumquat or Fukushu kumquat bears edible fruit that can be eaten raw. The fruit can be made into jelly and marmalade. The fruit can be round or bell shaped; it is bright orange when fully ripe. It may also be distinguished from other kumquats by its round leaves that make this species unique within the genus. It is grown for its edible fruit and as an ornamental plant. It cannot withstand frost.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">When the kumquats are divided into multiple species the name Fortunella obovata (Citrus obovata) is used for this group.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Cultivation and uses</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Kumquats are cultivated in China, South Korea, North Korea, Taiwan, Southeast Asia, Japan, the Middle East, Europe (notably Corfu, Greece), southern Pakistan, and the southern United States (notably Florida, Louisiana, Alabama) and California.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">They are much hardier than other citrus plants such as oranges. The 'Nagami' kumquat requires a hot summer, ranging from 25 °C to 38 °C (77 °F to 100 °F), but can withstand frost down to about −10 °C (14 °F) without injury. They grow in the tea hills of Hunan, China, where the climate is too cold for other citrus fruits, even the Mikan (also known as the Satsuma) orange. The trees differ also from other citrus species in that they enter into a period of winter dormancy so profound that they will remain in it through several weeks of subsequent warm weather without putting out new shoots or blossoms. Despite their ability to survive low temperatures, kumquat trees grow better and produce larger and sweeter fruits in warmer regions.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Uses</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Kumquats are often eaten raw. As the rind is sweet and the juicy center is sour, the raw fruit is usually consumed either whole—to savor the contrast—or only the rind is eaten. The fruit is considered ripe when it reaches a yellowish-orange stage and has just shed the last tint of green.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">Culinary uses include candying and kumquat preserves, marmalade, and jelly. Kumquats can also be sliced and added to salads. In recent years kumquats have gained popularity as a garnish for cocktail beverages, including the martini as a replacement for the more familiar olive. A kumquat liqueur mixes the fruit with vodka or other clear spirit. Kumquats are also being used by chefs to create a niche for their desserts and are common in European countries.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">The Cantonese often preserve kumquats in salt or sugar. A batch of the fruit is buried in dry salt inside a glass jar. Over time, all the juice from the fruit is diffused into the salt. The fruit in the jar becomes shrunken, wrinkled, and dark brown in color, and the salt combines with the juice to become a dark brown brine. A few salted kumquats with a few teaspoons of the brine/juice may be mixed with hot water to make a remedy for sore throats.[citation needed] A jar of such preserved kumquats can last several years and still keep its flavor.[citation needed]</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">In the Philippines and Taiwan, kumquats are a popular addition to green tea and black tea, either hot or iced.</span></div> <div><span style="font-size:10pt;">In Vietnam, kumquat bonsai trees (round kumquat plant) are used as a decoration for the Tết (Lunar New Year) holiday. Kumquat fruits are also boiled or dried to make a candied snack called mứt quất.</span></div> <div> <div> <div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">                                      all year round                                    </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">0.5-1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">min. 20° C.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Until it Germinates 7days - 2 Months</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;font-size:10pt;">Seeds Gallery 05.11.2012.</span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div> </div> </div>
V 50 G
Giant Kumquats or cumquats Seeds (Fortunella margarita) exotic tropical fruit
Golden Chain Tree Seeds 1.95 - 1

Golden Chain Tree Seeds...

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Golden Chain Tree Seeds (Laburnum anagyroides)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <div> <div>Hardy, Easy to Grow, Showy Flowering Tree or Shrub, Bonsai, Hedge, Arbor, Pergola, Allee or Espalier. Golden Chain Tree is a small, low-branched, deciduous tree or large shrub that is native to the mountains of central and southern Europe. It typically grows to 15 to 25 feet tall. It is most noted for its profuse and showy late spring bloom of gorgeous yellow flowers in 12 inch dense, pendulous, wisteria-like racemes. Flowers are beautifully displayed against deep green leaves; few trees are more lovely in flower. Trifoliate leaves with elliptic-lanceolate to obovate leaflets each to 3 inches long are a dull green to gray-green with pubescence underneath. Pea-like fruits in seed pods to 2 inches long ripen in fall. All parts of this plant, particularly the seeds, are poisonous.</div> <div>Other Names: Golden Chain Tree, Laburnum Vulgare, Cytisus Laburnum, Common Laburnum</div> <div>Zone: 5 to 7</div> <div>Growth Rate: Slow to moderate</div> <div>Plant Type: Deciduous Flowering Tree or Shrub</div> <div>Family: Fabaceae (Pea family)</div> <div>Native Range: Central and southern Europe</div> <div>Height: 15 to 30 feet</div> <div>Spread: 10 to 15 feet</div> <div>Bloom Time: May - June  </div> <div>Bloom Color: Bright Yellow</div> <div>Flower/Fruit: 6 to 12 inch yellow, pendulous flower racemes.</div> <div>Sun: Full Sun to PartSshade</div> <div>Fall Color: Insignificant fall color</div> <div>Water: Medium</div> <div>Maintenance: Medium</div> <div>Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Best grown in organically rich, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Soil drainage is particularly important. Best in full sun in the northern part of its growing range, but appreciates part afternoon shade in hot summer climates. Performs poorly in the heat and humidity of the deep South. Best performance generally occurs in climates such as the Pacific Northwest where both summer and winter temperature are moderate. It is best planted in protected locations to minimize risk of damage from sub-zero winter temperatures.</div> <div>Culture: If trained as a small tree, root suckers must be removed as they appear. Also consider removing the seedpods as they appear because they are not particularly ornamental, they consume plant energies.</div> <div>Uses: Small specimen tree, shrub border or hedge. Also may be grown as a large shrub. Train for arbors, pergolas, allees or espaliers. Good background plant.</div> <div><span style="color:#0000ff;"><strong><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDMapxyCTJ4&amp;feature=youtu.be" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><span style="color:#0000ff;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDMapxyCTJ4&amp;feature=youtu.be</span></a></strong></span></div> </div> <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Pour boiling water over seed, let stand in water for 24 hours. Seeds that swell after soaking in water are ready to germinate. Repeat process on seeds that did not imbibe. Seed coat may require filing or sanding to allow water infiltration.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">0</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">6,3 mm - 1/4"</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">22-25 ° C.</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">2-9 weeks</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table>
T 21
Golden Chain Tree Seeds 1.95 - 1
Moringa the Miracle Tree Seeds (Moringa oleifera PKM 1)

Moringa the Miracle Tree...

Price €2.65
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><span style="font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Moringa the Miracle Tree Seeds (Moringa oleifera PKM 1)</strong></span></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000; font-size: 14pt;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 or 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>For those of you who have never heard of Moringa, at all --- we'll just give you a really quick education on it.  Moringa Oleifera is the most commonly known variety of Moringa, and it has been grown in many countries, worldwide for thousands of years. Moringa Oleifera, the variety with which most people are familiar, is a slender tree, loaded with long, delicate-looking branches, which are covered with small, oval-shaped dark green leaves. Those lovely leaves are just packed with healthy, and tasty, nutrients. It is basically a tropical tree, but with care, it can be grown just about anywhere. It does NOT like the cold, so in areas where the temperatures get into the 40's, it needs to be kept warm. When the temperatures average in the low 60's, they tend to lose their leaves, and look a bit sickly. When the temperatures rise, they thrive! Ours made it through several winters here in FL, when the temperatures got as low as 28 degrees F, but we kept them sprinkled with water several times a day, and ran Christmas-type lights up, around and between the rows of seedlings.</p> <p>The Moringa Oleifera tree can reach great heights, left to itself, but that puts its harvest WAY out of reach.  Ideally, they should be kept to 6-12 feet, maximum, so you can easily prune the branches,</p> <p>cut the flowers, and harvest the pods. You can plant the seeds in a row, and maintain the Moringa Oleifera plants as a low hedge, if all you want to do is eat the leaves. They will provide you with abundant greens, as the more you trim them - the faster they seem to grow, the more branches they put out, and the bushier they get. If you do not prune them, the leaves will be hard to reach.</p> <p>Moringa Oleifera seeds are round and brown with tan "frilled" edges, while the seeds of the Moringa Stenopetala are a light tan, with a shape reminiscent of almonds or pistachios. Click on the bottom box on the right side of the page, to see the differences. It is unusual to see how different the seeds are, for a tree that is still Moringa. The little thumbnail photos above enlarge when you click on them</p> <p><strong><em>WIKIPEDIA:</em></strong></p> <p>Moringa oleifera is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Moringa, which is the only genus in the family Moringaceae. English common names include: moringa,[2] drumstick tree[2] (from the appearance of the long, slender, triangular seed-pods), horseradish tree[2] (from the taste of the roots, which resembles horseradish), ben oil tree or benzoil tree[2] (from the oil which is derived from the seeds). It is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree, native to the southern foothills of the Himalayas in northwestern India, and widely cultivated in tropical and sub-tropical areas where its young seed pods and leaves are used as a vegetable.</p> <p><strong>Description</strong></p> <p>Moringa oleifera is a fast growing, evergreen, deciduous tree. It can reach a height of 10–12 m [5] and the trunk can reach a diameter of 45 cm.[6] The bark has a whitish-grey colour and is surrounded by thick cork. Young shoots have purplish or greenish-white hairy bark. The tree has an open crown of drooping, fragile branches and the leaves build up a feathery foliage of tripinnate leaves.</p> <p>The flowers are fragrant and bisexual, surrounded by five unequal thinly veined yellowish-white petals. The flowers are approximately 1-1.5 cm long and 2 cm broad. They grow on slender hairy stalks in spreading or drooping later flower clusters which have a longitude of 10–25 cm.[5]</p> <p>Flowering begins within the first six months after planting. In seasonally cool regions, flowering will only occur once a year between April and June. In more constant seasonal temperature and with constant rainfall, flowering can happen twice or even all year-round.</p> <p>The fruit is a hanging, three-sided brown capsule of 20–45 cm size which holds dark brown, globular seeds with a diameter of approximately 1 cm. The seeds have three whitish papery wings and are dispersed by wind and water.</p> <p>In cultivation, it is often cut back annually to 1–2 meters and allowed to regrow so the pods and leaves remain within arm's reach.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>The moringa tree is grown mainly in semiarid, tropical, and subtropical areas, corresponding in the United States to USDA hardiness zones 9 and 10. It grows best in dry sandy soil and tolerates poor soil, including coastal areas. As with all plants, optimum cultivation depends on producing the right environment for the plant to thrive. Moringa is a sun and heat-loving plant, and thus does not tolerate freeze or frost. Moringa is particularly suitable for dry regions, as it can be grown using rainwater without expensive irrigation techniques.</p> <p><strong>Production area</strong></p> <p>As of 2010, cultivation in Hawaii, for commercial distribution in the United States, is in its early stages.</p> <p>"India is the largest producer of moringa, with an annual production of 1.1 to 1.3 million tonnes of tender fruits from an area of 380 km². Among the states, Andhra Pradesh leads in both area and production (156.65 km²) followed by Karnataka (102.8 km²) and Tamil Nadu (74.08 km²). In other states, it occupies an area of 46.13 km². Tamil Nadu is the pioneering state in·so·much as it has varied genotypes from diversified geographical areas and introductions from Sri Lanka."</p> <p>Moringa is grown in home gardens and as living fences in Southern India and Thailand, where it is commonly sold in local markets.[11] In the Philippines, it is commonly grown for its leaves which are used in soup. Moringa is also actively cultivated by the World Vegetable Center in Taiwan, a center for vegetable research with a mission to reduce poverty and malnutrition in developing countries through improved production and consumption of vegetables. Tamil Nadu, Southern India has moringa in its folk stories and use in home gardens. In Haiti it is grown as windbreaks and to help reduce soil erosion.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation practice</strong></p> <p>Moringa can be grown as an annual or perennial plant. In the first year all pods are edible. Later years also bear non edible bitter pods. Therefore Moringa is often commercially cultivated annually. On less favorable locations the perennial cultivation has big advantages. Erosion is much smaller with perennial cultivation.[13] Perennial cultivation of Moringa is also practiced in agroforestry.</p> <p><strong>Soil preparations</strong></p> <p>In tropical cultivation sides the soil erosion is a major problem. Therefore the soil treatment has to be as low as possible. Plowing is required only for high planting densities. In low planting densities "it is better to dig pits and refill them with the soil. This ensures good root system penetration without causing too much land erosion. The pits must be 30 to 50 cm deep, and 20 to 40 cm wide."</p> <p><strong>Propagation</strong></p> <p>Moringa can be propagated from seed or cuttings. Direct seeding is possible because the germination rate of Moringa oleifera is high. After 12 days the germination rate is about 85%.[8] Production in seedbeds or containers is very time consuming. In these technics the plants can be better protected from insects and other pests. They are also used in areas where soil erosion is a problem.</p> <p>Cuttings of 1 meter length and a diameter of at least 4 cm can be also used for propagation.[8] At least one third of the cutting must be buried in the soil. In the Philippines, moringa is propagated by planting 1–2 m-long limbs cuttings, preferably from June to August. It can also be propagated by seeds, which are planted an inch below the surface and can be germinated year-round in well-draining soil.</p> <p><strong>Planting</strong></p> <p>For intensive leaf production "the spacing of plants should be 15 x 15 cm or 20 x 10 cm, with conveniently spaced alleys (for example: every 4 meters) to facilitate plantation management and harvests. Another option is to space the seeding lines 45 cm apart and to sow every 5cm on those lines. One can also space the lines only 30 cm apart and sow at a larger distance on the lines (10 to 20 cm)".[8] Weeding and disease prevention are difficult because of the high density.</p> <p>In a semi-intensive production the plants are spaced 50 cm to 1 m apart. This gives good results with less maintenance.</p> <p>Moringa trees can also be cultivated in alleys, as natural fences and associated with other crops. The distance between moringa rows in an agroforestry cultivation are usually between 2 to 4 meters.[8]In Haiti it is being used as fencing and windbreaks on farms.</p> <p><strong>Breeding</strong></p> <p>In India, from which Moringa most likely originates, the diversity of Moringa in cultivars in wild types is large.[13] This gives a good basis for breeding programs. In countries where Moringa has been introduced as a cultivar, the diversity is usually much smaller among the cultivar types. Locally well adapted wild types on the other hand, can be found in most regions.</p> <p>Because Moringa is cultivated and used in different ways, exist different breeding aims. The breeding aims for an annual or a perennial plant are obviously different. The yield stability of fruits are an important breeding aim for the commercial cultivation in India where Moringa is cultivated annually. On less favorable locations the perennial cultivation has big advantages. Erosion is much smaller with perennial cultivation.[13] Perennial cultivation of Moringa is also used in agroforestry. In Pakistan varieties have been tested for their nutritional composition of the leaves on different locations.[14] The different breeding aims result in a different selection. India selects for a higher number of pods and dwarf or semi-dwarf varieties. Breeders in Tanzania on the other hand are selecting for a higher oil content.[15] In total, only little breeding has been achieved so far.</p> <p><strong>Yield and Harvest</strong></p> <p>Moringa oleifera can be cultivated for its leaves, pods and/or its kernels for oil extraction and water purification. The yields vary widely, depending on season, variety, fertilization, and irrigation regime. Moringa yields best under warm, dry conditions with some supplemental fertilizer and irrigation.[16] Moringa harvest is done manually with knifes, sickles and stabs with hooks attached to it.</p> <p><strong>Fruits</strong></p> <p>When the plant is grown up from cuttings the first harvest can already take place after 6-8 month after plantation. Often, the fruits are not yielded in the first year and the yield is generally low during the first years. By year 2 it produces around 300 pods, by year 3 around 400-500. A good tree can yield 1000 or more pods.[17] In India a hectare can produce 31 tons of pods per year.[16] Under North Indian conditions the fruits ripen during the summer. Sometimes, particularly in South India, flowers and fruits appear twice a year and so there are 2 harvests, in July to September and March to April.</p> <p><strong>Leaves</strong></p> <p>Average yields of 6 tons/ha/year in fresh matter are can be achieved. The harvest differs strongly between the rainy and dry season with 1120 kg/ha per harvest and 690 kg/ha per harvest. The leaves and stems can be harvested from the young plants 60 days after seeding and then another 7 times in the year. At every harvest the plants are cut back to within 60 cm of the ground.[19] In some production systems the leaves are harvested every 2 weeks. Foidl. et al. (2001) showed that the cultivation of Moringa oleifera can also be done intensively with irrigation and fertilization with suitable varieties. Trials in Nicaragua with 1 million plant/ha and 9 cuttings/year over 4 years gave an average fresh matter production of 580 metric tons per ha/year equivalent to about 174 metric tons of fresh leaves.</p> <p><strong>Oil</strong></p> <p>One estimate for yield of oil from kernels is 250 liters per hectare.[16]The oil can be used as a food supplement, as a base for cosmetics and for hair and the skin.</p> <p><strong>Pests and diseases</strong></p> <p>The moringa tree is not affected by any serious diseases in its native or introduced ranges.</p> <p>In India there are several insect pests, including various caterpillars such as the bark-eating caterpillar, the hairy caterpillar or the green leaf caterpillar. The budworms Noctuidae are known to cause serious defoliation. Damaging agents can also be aphids, stem borers and fruity flies. In some regions termites can also cause minor damages. If termites are numerous in soils the insects management costs are not bearable.</p> <p>The moringa tree is a host to Leveillula taurica, a powdery mildew which causes damage in papaya crops in south India. Cultivation management should therefore be checked.</p> <p><strong>Leaves</strong></p> <p>The leaves are the most nutritious part of the plant, being a significant source of B vitamins, vitamin C, provitamin A as beta-carotene, vitamin K, manganese and protein, among other essential nutrients.[22][23] When compared with common foods particularly high in certain nutrients per 100 g fresh weight, cooked moringa leaves are considerable sources of these same nutrients. See chart on the right for nutritional value for fresh leaves. See chart below for nutrional value of dried leaves.</p> <p>Some of the calcium in moringa leaves is bound as crystals of calcium oxalate[26] though at levels 25-45 times less than that found spinach, which is a negligible amount.</p> <p>The leaves are cooked and used like spinach. In addition to being used fresh as a substitute for spinach, its leaves are commonly dried and crushed into a powder used in soups and sauces. As with most foods, heating moringa above 140 degrees Fahrenheit destroys some of the nutritional value.</p> <p><strong>Drumsticks</strong></p> <p>The immature seed pods, called "drumsticks", are commonly consumed in South Asia. They are prepared by parboiling, and cooked in a curry until soft.[27] The seed pods/fruits, even when cooked by boiling, remain particularly high in vitamin C[28] (which may be degraded variably by cooking) and are also a good source of dietary fiber, potassium, magnesium and manganese.</p> <p><strong>Seeds</strong></p> <p>The seeds, sometimes removed from more mature pods and eaten like peas or roasted like nuts, contain high levels of vitamin C and moderate amounts of B vitamins and dietary minerals (right table, USDA).</p> <p><strong>Seed oil</strong></p> <p>Mature seeds yield 38–40% edible oil called ben oil from its high concentration of behenic acid. The refined oil is clear and odorless, and resists rancidity. The seed cake remaining after oil extraction may be used as a fertilizer or as a flocculent to purify water.[29] Moringa seed oil also has potential for use as a biofuel.</p> <p><strong>Roots</strong></p> <p>The roots are shredded and used as a condiment in the same way as horseradish; however, they contain an alkaloid, potentially having nerve-paralyzing properties.</p> <p><strong>Malnutrition relief</strong></p> <p>Moringa trees have been used to combat malnutrition, especially among infants and nursing mothers. Five NGOs in particular — Trees for Life International, The Christian and Missionary Alliance, Church World Service, Educational Concerns for Hunger Organization, and Volunteer Partnerships for West Africa — have advocated moringa as "natural nutrition for the tropics."[25] One author stated that "the nutritional properties of Moringa are now so well known that there seems to be little doubt of the substantial health benefit to be realized by consumption of Moringa leaf powder in situations where starvation is imminent."</p> <p>Moringa is especially promising as a food source in the tropics because the tree is in full leaf at the end of the dry season when other foods are typically scarce.</p> <p><strong>Culinary uses</strong></p> <p>Moringa has numerous applications in cooking throughout its regional distribution. It may be preserved by canning and exported.</p> <p>In Bangladesh, it is made into a variety of curry dishes by mixing with coconut, poppy seeds, and mustard or boiled until the drumsticks are semisoft and consumed directly without any extra processing or cooking. It is used in curries, sambars, kormas, and dals, although it is also used to add flavor to cutlets and other recipes.</p> <p>The fruit meat of drum sticks, including young seeds, is used for soup. Young leaves can either be fried with shrimp or added as a topping in fish soup.</p> <p>There are several traditional Cambodian dishes using leaves (sluc) of the moringa tree known as daum m'rum,[37] such as korko (a mixed vegetable soup). As it is a favorite vegetable, Cambodians traditionally grow moringa trees close to their residences.</p> <p>In South India, Sri Lanka and Java, it is used to prepare a variety of sambar, is fried, or made into curry dishes by mixing with coconut, poppy seeds, and mustard or boiled until the drumsticks are semisoft and consumed directly without any extra processing or cooking. It is used in curries, sambars, kormas, and dals, although it is also used to add flavors, such as in ghee and soups. In Maharashtra, the pods are used in sweet and sour curries. In Gujarat and Rajasthan, the pods are used in to cook a spicy curry.</p> <p>Tender drumstick leaves, finely chopped, are used as garnish for vegetable dishes and salads. It is also used in place of or along with coriander. In some regions, the flowers are gathered and cleansed to be cooked with besan to make pakoras.</p> <p>The leaves may be fried and mixed with dried-fried tuna chips (Maldive fish), onions and dried chillies. This is equivalent to a sambal and eaten along with rice and curry. In one area in the Maldives, a soup is made with these leaves and rice, and eaten especially for breakfast during the month of Ramazan. It is also a common ingredient in an omelet. The pods are used to cook a mild curry.</p> <p>In the Punjab region of India and Pakistan, moringa called Soanjhna flowers are first separated from the stem, boiled, mashed and cooked. Curdle is an important element of its recipe to create a specific taste and favorite dish.</p> <p>The green pods, the leaves and the flowers are used in a variety of Thai dishes, such as curries, stir-fries, soups, omelets and salads. One of the most traditional dishes is sour Thai curry made with the drumstick pods and fish.</p> <p>In the Philippines, moringa leaves, known as kamunggay, malunggay or marungay, are commonly added to broth as a simple soup. The leaves may also be used as a typical ingredient in tinola, a traditional chicken dish consisting of chicken in a broth, moringa leaves, and either green papaya or another vegetable or in the all vegetable dish known as utan. The leaves can also be processed with olive oil and salt for a pesto-like pasta sauce that has become popular on the Filipino culinary scene. Moringa juice may be mixed with lemonsito juice to make ice candies or cold drinks, possibly more palatable to those who dislike vegetables.</p> <p>In 2007, Filipino Senator Loren Legarda campaigned for the popularization of moringa. She asked the government to make moringa among its priority crops for propagation, citing a Bureau of Plant Industry report about moringa's nutritional content.[38][39] The leaves may also be used in making polvoron (a milky, powdered snack), biofuel, and ben oil.</p> <p><strong>Other uses</strong></p> <p>In developing countries, moringa has the potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development, and support sustainable landcare.[35] It may be used as forage for livestock, a micronutrient liquid, a natural anthelmintic and possible adjuvant.</p> <p>Moringa has been used in folk medicine,[36] including Siddha medicine and Ayurvedic traditional medicines and in the Philippines.[43] In Ayurvedic traditional medicine, the leaves are believed to affect blood pressure and glucose levels.[44] In Africa, Indonesia and Philippines, moringa leaves are given to nursing mothers in the belief that they increase lactation.</p> <p><iframe width="640" height="385" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/txbXMGnCERU?rel=0&amp;hd=1" frameborder="0" class="embed-responsive-item"> </iframe></p> </div> </body> </html>
T 38 10S
Moringa the Miracle Tree Seeds (Moringa oleifera PKM 1)

Variety from Serbia
Somborka hot bell pepper seeds

Somborka hot bell pepper seeds

Price €1.85
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2><strong>SOMBORKA hot bell pepper seeds - Serbian variety</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 20 or 200 (1,14 g) seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>This variety comes from Serbia. And the name has gotten to the city of <strong>Sombor</strong>. Read more about <strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombor" target="_blank" title="Read more about Sombor city here" rel="noreferrer noopener">Sombor</a><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sombor" target="_blank" title="Read more about Sombor city here" rel="noreferrer noopener"> city here</a>.</strong></p> <p>SOMBORKA is the earliest variety of hot paprika with a conical shape that is suitable for growing outdoors as well as in a greenhouse. Somborka is the most popular pepper in Serbia when it comes to pickling.</p> <p>The meat is juicy and thick, light yellow in technical maturity, red in botanical color.</p> <p>It is harvested 5-6 times a season. Possible yield is 35-40 t / ha.</p> <p><span style="font-size: 10pt;"><strong>Serbian variety</strong></span></p> </body> </html>
P 183 20S
Somborka hot bell pepper seeds
Redcurrant Seeds (Ribes...

Redcurrant Seeds (Ribes...

Price €1.95
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5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <div id="idTab1" class="rte"> <h2><strong>Redcurrant Seeds (Ribes rubrum)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 10 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The redcurrant (or red currant), Ribes rubrum, is a member of the genus Ribes in the gooseberry family Grossulariaceae, native to parts of western Europe (Belgium, France, Norway, Sweden, Germany, Netherlands, northern Italy, northern Spain, Portugal and Poland). It is a deciduous shrub normally growing to 1–1.5 m (3-5 feet) tall, occasionally 2 m (6.5 feet), with five-lobed leaves arranged spirally on the stems. The flowers are inconspicuous yellow-green, in pendulous 4–8 cm (1.5-3 inch) racemes, maturing into bright red translucent edible berries about 8–12 mm (.3-.8 inch) diameter, with 3–10 berries on each raceme. An established bush can produce 3–4 kilos (6.5-9 lbs) of berries from mid to late summer.</p> <p><strong>Cultivation</strong></p> <p>There are several other similar species native in Europe, Asia and North America, also with edible fruit, though usually considered to have an inferior flavour. These include Ribes spicatum (northern Europe and northern Asia), Ribes alpinum (northern Europe), R. schlechtendalii (northeast Europe), R. multiflorum (southeast Europe), R. petraeum (southwest Europe) and R. triste (North America; Newfoundland to Alaska and southward in mountains).</p> <p>While Ribes rubrum and R. nigrum are native to northern and eastern Europe, large berried cultivars of the redcurrant were first produced in Belgium and northern France in the 17th century. In modern times, numerous cultivars have been selected; some of these have escaped gardens and can be found in the wild across Europe and extending into Asia.</p> <p>The white currant is also a cultivar of Ribes rubrum.[2] Although it is a sweeter and albino variant of the redcurrant, it is not a separate botanical species and is sometimes marketed with names such as Ribes sativum or Ribes silvestre, or sold as a different fruit.</p> <p>Currant bushes prefer partial to full sunlight and can grow in most types of soil.[2] They are relatively low-maintenance plants and can also be used as ornamentation.</p> <p><strong>Culinary uses</strong></p> <p>With maturity, the tart flavour of redcurrant fruit is slightly greater than its blackcurrant relative, but with the same approximate sweetness. The albino variant of redcurrant, often referred to as white currant, has the same tart flavour but with greater sweetness. Although frequently cultivated for jams and cooked preparations, much like the white currant, it is often served raw or as a simple accompaniment in salads, garnishes, or drinks when in season.</p> <p>In the United Kingdom, redcurrant jelly is a condiment traditionally served with lamb in a Sunday roast. It is essentially a jam and is made in the same way, by adding the redcurrants to sugar, boiling, and straining.</p> <p>In France, the highly rarefied and hand-made Bar-le-duc or Lorraine jelly is a spreadable preparation traditionally made from white currants or alternatively red currants.</p> <p>In Scandinavia and Schleswig-Holstein, it is often used in fruit soups and summer puddings (Rødgrød, Rote Grütze or Rode Grütt). In Germany it is also used in combination with custard or meringue as a filling for tarts. In Linz, Austria, it is the most commonly used filling for the Linzer torte.[4] It can be enjoyed in its fresh state without the addition of sugar.</p> <p> </p> <p>In German-speaking areas, syrup or nectar derived from the red currant is added to soda water and enjoyed as a refreshing drink named Johannisbeerschorle. It is so named because the redcurrants (Johannisbeeren, "John's berry" in German) are said to ripen first on St. John's Day, also known as Midsummer Day, June 24.</p> <p>In Russia, redcurrants are ubiquitous and used in jams, preserves, compotes and desserts; while leaves have many uses in traditional medicine.</p> </div> </body> </html>
V 129 R
Redcurrant Seeds (Ribes rubrum)
Sargent's Crab apple Seeds (Malus sargentii) 1.95 - 1

Sargent's Crab apple Seeds...

Price €1.95
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5/ 5
<h2><strong>Sargent's Crab apple Seeds (Malus sargentii)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color:#ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>Hardy, Adaptable, Easy to Grow, Fast Growth, Bonsai, Espalier,  Showy Fragrant Flowers, Edible Fruits, Fall Colors, Winter Interest, Attracts Birds, Butterflies and Hummingbirds, Wildlife Food/Shelter, Cold, Drought  and Wind Tolerant</p> <p>Sargent’s Crabapple is a dwarf, deciduous flowering tree growing 6 to 8 feet tall by 8 to 10 feet wide. Pink buds open to a profuse, spring bloom of fragrant, 1 inch sparkling white flowers. Profuse bloom often occurs only in alternate years. Flowers are followed by small, 1/4 inch, shiny red crabapples, which mature in the fall. The pea-sized fruits are sweet flavored like rose hips, but are not usually used in cooking. Fruits are long-lasting providing winter interest and are attractive to birds and other wildlife. The ovate, lobed, dark green leaves turn yellow in autumn. The yellow fall color contrasts well with the red fruit. The smallest of the flowering crabapple species, this unique very small tree exhibits a very dense, wide-spreading,rounded habit. It can also be grown as a dense multi-stemmed shrub for use in borders or as a screen or hedge.</p> <p>Apple trees begin to fruit in the 3rd year and come into full production from the 11th to 20th year. They may continue to fruit for about 100 years although the fruits may become commercially unprofitable. They require a period of winter dormancy, in general 900-1000 hours of more at less than 45°F. They performs best in areas with medium to low humidity, with long daylight hours, high light intensity and relatively warm days and cool nights.</p> <p>Other Names: Sargent's Crab apple, Sargent Crab apple, Sargent's Crabapple, Sargent Crabapple</p> <p>Zone: 4 to 7</p> <p>Growth Rate: Fast</p> <p>Plant Type: Small deciduous fruiting tree</p> <p>Family: Rosaceae</p> <p>Native Range: Japan</p> <p>Height: 6 to 8 feet</p> <p>Spread: 8 to 10 feet</p> <p>Shape: Rounded small tree with a dense crown.</p> <p>Bloom Time: April-May</p> <p>Bloom Color: Pink buds opening toWhite</p> <p>Flower/Fruit: White fragrant flowers followed by shiny red 1/4 inch fruit</p> <p>Sun: Full Sun</p> <p>Fall Color: Yellow</p> <p>Drought Tolerance: Moderate</p> <p>Water: Medium</p> <p>Maintenance: Low</p> <p>Site Requirements/ Soil Tolerances: Best grown in loamy, medium moisture, well-drained, acidic soil in full sun. Adapts to a wide range of soils.</p> <p>Culture: Prune May to early June (after flowering but before flower buds form for the following year). Responds well to pruning and may be used as a hedge plant.</p> <p>Uses: Bonsai, espalier, screen, specimen, street tree. A dwarf species which is effective when planted as a small specimen or in groups, near fences, in borders or as a screen or hedge.</p> <div> <div> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tbody><tr><td colspan="2" valign="top" width="100%"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Instructions</strong></span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Propagation:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Seeds</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Pretreat:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">soak in water for 24  hours</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Stratification:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">2-3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">all year round</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Depth:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">1 cm</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Sowing Mix:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination temperature:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">min. 20 ° C</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Location:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">bright + keep constantly moist not wet</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Germination Time:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">until it germinates </span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong>Watering:</strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color:#008000;">Water regularly during the growing season</span></p> </td> </tr><tr><td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color:#008000;"><strong> </strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color:#008000;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. </em><em>All Rights Reserved.</em></span></p> </td> </tr></tbody></table></div> </div>
V 65
Sargent's Crab apple Seeds (Malus sargentii) 1.95 - 1
Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) 3 - 1

Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese...

Price €3.00
,
5/ 5
<!DOCTYPE html> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" /> </head> <body> <h2>Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia)</h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;">Price for Package of 5 seeds.</span></h2> <div>Hardy, Showy Spring Flowers, Edible Fruits, Fall Color, Fast Growth, Shade Tree, Specimen Tree, Adaptable, Cold Tolerant, Espalier</div> <div>The Chinese Sand Pear is larger than most kinds of pear trees, reaching as high as 40 feet, with a rounded crown that may spread 20 feet or more across. In bloom, the tree is almost completely covered with white flowers, putting on a spectacular show in early spring. Individually, the flowers are 1 to 1.5 inches across, with five petals and similar to apple except for having longer pedicels.</div> <div>Asian Pears appear more like apple than European pear and have hard, crisp flesh like fruit when ripe, unlike the melting flesh European pears. Also, Asian pears will ripen on trees like apples, but European pears are subject to core breakdown if allowed to ripen fully on-tree. Chinese Sand Pears should be picked when they reach full size and begin to turn yellow. This also prevents maturation of the stone cells which give Sand Pears their gritty texture. Many growers wrap their pears individually in paper and store at room temperature.</div> <div>Although children may disagree, Chinese Sand Pear are generally considered inedible unless cooked. The fruits are hard and the flesh is grainy, some say "sandy" in texture. They are most useful for making pies, pear butter, preserves, and for canning.</div> <div>Asian Pears were domesticated in China about the same time European Pears were in Europe, 3000 years ago. Pyrus pyrifolia is native to central and southern China and probably the first to be domesticated. Chinese writings dating from 200-1000 BC describe pear propagation and culture. Asian Pears moved from China to Japan, Korea and Taiwan, where they are cultivated commercially today.</div> <div>Other Names: Crunch Pear, Apple Pear, Korean Pear, Japanese Pear, Taiwan Pear, Salad Pear, Nashi</div> <div>Zone: 5 to 9</div> <div>Growth Rate: Fast</div> <div>Plant Type: Deciduous Fruiting Tree</div> <div>Family: Rosaceae</div> <div>Native Range: China and Japan</div> <div>Height: 30 to 40 feet</div> <div>Spread: 20 to 30 feet</div> <div>Shape: Dense broadly pyramidal to rounded.</div> <div>Bloom Time: March-April</div> <div>Bloom Color: White</div> <div>Flower/Fruit: White flowers, 1 to 1.5 inches across with five petals followed by an edible round pome.</div> <div>Sun: Full sun</div> <div>Fall Color: Yellow, Orange, Red</div> <div>Drought Tolerance: Moderate</div> <div>Water: Moderate</div> <div>Maintenance: Medium-High</div> <div>Site Requirements /Soil Tolerances: Pears tolerate heavy, poorly drained soils better than most tree fruits. However, productivity is best on deep, well-drained loams with pH 6-7. Pears have very similar climatic requirements to apples, but are much more prone to fire blight and therefore cannot tolerate humid, wet springs. Pears require 900-1000 chill hours to break dormancy, although many Asian pears have lower chill requirements and can be grown as far south as northern Florida. Pears have similar or slightly lower cold hardiness than apples, tolerating  -10 to -20 F. Pears bloom 1-3 weeks before apple, and are therefore  prone to frost damage in most regions. Pears mature in as little as 90 days or as long as 200 days.</div> <div>Culture: Pears should not be over fertilized as this can lead to fire blight, a severe bacterial disease. Pyrus pyrifolia requires cross-pollination in order to bear fruit</div> <div>Uses: Group or specimen. Small shade tree. May be used as a street tree. A very good choice for colder climates and very ornamental. May be espaliered or Bonsai.</div> <div>  <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="1"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" width="100%" valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Instructions</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Propagation:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Seeds / Cuttings</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Pretreat:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>soak in water for 24  hours</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Stratification:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>3 months in moist sowing mix at 2-5 ° C refrigerator</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Time:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>all year round</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Depth:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>1 cm</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Sowing Mix:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Coir or sowing mix + sand or perlite</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Germination temperature:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>20+ ° C</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Location:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>bright + keep constantly moist not wet</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Germination Time:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>until it germinates </em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Watering:</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Water regularly during the growing season</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td valign="top" nowrap="nowrap"> <p><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em> </em></span></strong></span></p> </td> <td valign="top"> <p><br /><span style="color: #008000;"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em>Copyright © 2012 Seeds Gallery - Saatgut Galerie - Galerija semena. All Rights Reserved.</em></span></strong></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </div> </body> </html>
V 30
Asian Pear Seeds - Chinese Sand Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) 3 - 1
Rare Black Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys nigra)

Rare Black Bamboo Seeds...

Price €1.95
,
5/ 5
<h2><strong>Rare Black Bamboo&nbsp;Seeds&nbsp;(Phyllostachys nigra)</strong></h2> <h2><span style="color: #ff0000;"><strong>Price for Package of 5 seeds.</strong></span></h2> <p>The popular &amp; beautiful Black Bamboo with jet black culms &amp; feathery green leaves</p> <div>can grow to an average of 25' in most climates.&nbsp;Although sometimes erroneously reported as a clumping bamboo,&nbsp;it is a runner that starts slow but then can become vigorous when mature.</div> <div>The recommended zones are 7-10 although it will reach approx. 16' in zone 6 &amp; will grow in zone 5 in a very well protected location although the growth will probably be spindly.</div> <div>An awesome choice to grow indoors!</div> <div>&nbsp;Very exotic, it has a dramatic straight upright habit growing 6-10' in a pot but can be easily pruned to keep shorter. Locate in sunniest window, feed and water amply during the growth period &amp; summer outdoors (protect from strong winds).</div> <div>Soak your seeds in about 85° F (30° C) water for 24 hours. Make sure it doesn’t get too hot, as temperatures over 105° F (40° C) can kill your seeds. Cooler temperatures however, will not hurt the seeds, but may delay germination by a few days.</div> <div>5</div> <div>Use a skewer or chopstick to open and rough up the top part of the peat pellets.</div> <div>6</div> <div>Put only one seed in the middle of each pellet. Because bamboo seeds are rare and expensive, you don't want to risk having two sprout in the same pellet and have to lose one of them.</div> <div>7</div> <div>Add a small amount of “seedling mix�? type potting soil over the top of your seeds. 1/8 to ¼ inch (2 to 5 mm) is enough.</div> <div>8</div> <div>Put the mini greenhouse in a location where it will get medium shade. An east-facing window is good if the weather outside is cold, or a moderately shady area outside if the weather is good. NOTE: Wherever you put it, it should not get too much direct sun. Even a mini greenhouse can quickly get up to seed killing temperatures in hot direct sun.</div> <div>9</div> <div>Check on the greenhouse daily, as the peat pellets can dry out quickly once the water from main soak evaporates. Before the seeds sprout, they can survive getting too dry once or so. But as soon as they sprout, they can die in a matter of hours if they dry out. If the peat pellets start getting too dry, use a spray bottle to dampen them again. You may need as much as a whole squirt per pellet to dampen to the interior of the pellet.</div> <div>10</div> <div>You may see a sprout within 10 days from planting, though the bulk of germination will occur after at least 15 or 20 days. Different species have different germination rates, so don’t get disappointed too soon.</div> <div>11</div> <div>If any of the sprouts get tall enough to touch the plastic dome lid while others are still getting started, prop the lid up as necessary to prevent the leaves from touching it… Any leaves resting against the lid will quickly rot and risk killing the seedling.</div> <div>12</div> <div>After about 30 days, most of the seeds that are going to sprout with this method will have done so. Transplant all of the healthy sprouts into 4�? (or half-liter) pots using the next few steps. But don’t discard the rest of the seeds yet, as we will jar a few more into action by changing the conditions for them.</div> <div>13</div> <div>Mix a good potting soil with about 50% small bark-chip mulch. This makes a potting mix with very high drainage that is good for bamboo.</div> <div>14</div> <div>Put a little (1/2 inch or 1 cm minimum) of this potting mix into the pots.</div> <div>15</div> <div>Move each pellet that has a sprout into a pot and fill around it so that the pellet is buried at least ¼ inch below the potting soil.</div> <div>16</div> <div>Give the pots a good dose of water. Because of the really good drainage, don’t worry too much about over watering.</div> <div>17</div> <div>Set these pots in an outdoor location that gets about 50% shade and that never gets full hot direct sun for more than a few minutes at a time. These seedlings are now well on their way. You will likely lose another 10% of them for no apparent reason at all, but the rest will have a good chance at making it to maturity.</div> <div>18</div> <div>Go back to the tray of remaining un-sprouted seeds and put the plastic lid aside. Store it for future use if you want, but these seeds and seedlings have no more use for it.</div> <div>19</div> <div>If your mini-greenhouse tray has a removable plastic liner that helps organize the pellets, take it out and make several drainage holes in the bottom of the unlined tray.</div> <div>20</div> <div>Put all of the pellets back in without the liner. Space them roughly evenly, and keep them the same side up as before… Seeds to the top.</div> <div>21</div> <div>Fill in around the pellets with seedling mix type potting soil, and mound it up to cover the top of the pellets by about ¼ inch (5mm).</div> <div>22</div> <div>Place this tray outside in the medium to full sun, checking it daily to keep it damp but not too wet. Because of removing the dome and the increased sun, expect to need to water nearly every day. It is probably helpful to switch to a regular watering can at this point, as you can give it a more normal dose of water.</div> <div>23</div> <div>Hopefully, you will see a whole new set of seedlings start to come up over the next few weeks. As these start to look ready, take them back to step 12 and get them transplanted.</div>
B 2 PN
Rare Black Bamboo Seeds (Phyllostachys nigra)